Fly Fishing is Like Life

It is ultimately futile, which is why fly-fishing is like life. At first sight, to stand waist-deep in cold water, thrashing the pool as the rain thrashes you, and where only the mozzies are biting, is not an obviously attractive way to spend precious days away from the wage-face.

fly-fishing-in-the-river

Do not even think how much you’ve paid to get yourself into this ridiculous position. You could tell yourself it is cheaper than ocean racing, usually described as standing under a cold shower tearing up 20 [pounds sterling] notes, but at least that looks stylish in the pictures. The sad anorak in the river is merely a blot on the landscape. Those who don’t, just cannot grasp that the very next cast will be the one that changes your life.

Besides, you may be out there on your own, but you are not alone in your triumph of hope over experience. Millions of people who can’t understand why we do it play the lottery every week, unable or unwilling to grasp just how mind-numbingly awful are the odds against winning. Here is how bad they are: a middle-aged man in reasonable health should wait until after teatime on the day of the draw, because only then are his chances of dying before the draw takes place smaller than his chances of winning. You prepare all dry flies, rod, lures, best portable fish finder, waders, hat, etc., everything seems to be ready for fishing.

In fact, the chances are worse than those of catching a salmon by casting into an empty pool even you use best depth finder to find fish– you obviously won’t catch a fish, but the practice will improve your casting, so the next time there is something to be caught, you’ll present the fly that little bit better.

No matter how many times you’ve practised doing the lottery, you don’t get any better at it. Your chances of winning do not improve. They remain as mathematically close to zero as makes no difference. Of course, the lottery-playing millions don’t think about probabilities, they just feel lucky. They’d rather not know, just as the salmon fisherman would rather not know whether he’s wasting his time in non-fishy water.

fly-fishing

Why on earth do we do it? The silliest questions are always the hardest to answer. Start with the nearest thing in fishing to a mind game, dry-fly for trout in a stream, on a summer’s day, not too bright, gentle breeze over your left shoulder. Are you standing comfortably? Just across the stream, close to that overhanging tree, there’s a plop and the rings of bright water which signal a rising fish.

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Life Aboard

When someone says the word ‘adventure’ what do you think of?  Some may think of camping on some forgotten mountain, others may think of exploring a deep, underground cave, and still others may think of sailing on the open seas.

For thousands of years, humankind has wanted to set out on adventures and one of the biggest ones was sailing.  We read stories of young boys who run away and join a crew searching for a new life of excitement.  This dream continues today; many people have made their home on the sea.

house-on-the-beach- Pram And Stroller Safety Tip

But where do you start from?  How do you go from living in a very normal house on land to living on a ship on the wild ocean?  Well first you have to make the decision. Continue reading

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Deep Sea Fishing

If you are looking for a small catch you may enjoy fishing in lakes and rivers but for those looking for a bigger prize deep sea fishing is for you.  Starting at least 30 meters and going down from there, deep sea fishing is not for the faint of heart.

Deep Sea Fishing in Sri Lanka

Deep Sea Fishing in Sri Lanka

Fish Type

While you may get trout and salmon by your more shallow fishing, deep sea fishing allows you access to a completely different variety of fish; anywhere from sharks to tuna, from marlin to swordfish.  And while you’re out there you may see whales, dolphins, and seals as well.

The fish you catch here can weigh anywhere from 10 to 70 pounds (4.5 to 32 kgs).  Due to the drastic different in weight between inland fish and deep sea fish, the method varies.  Just about anyone can pull in a fish inland without more than a stable rod and some line. But if you tried to use that out in the sea the line would snap before you even started trying to pull the fish in. Continue reading

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The Story of Protecting Salmon (Part II)

 

The Canada-U.S. salmon treaty, which had been stitched together by the fishing industry in 1985, was falling apart. We had all been told the treaty would control overfishing by both countries’ salmon fleets, and resolve harvest-share disputes between both countries. Neither has happened.

Sockeye Salmon

Sockeye Salmon

In 1992, harvest-share talks collapsed, the season was a free-for-all, and in the end, the industry stakeholders blamed everything on Indian poachers.

In 1994, Brian Tobin, who had learned there were votes to be had by chasing Spaniards away from the poor darling turbots in Atlantic, declared war on U.S. salmon fishermen in the Pacific.

In 1997, at Glen Clark’s behest, another fish war ensued, this time to beggar a few Washington state fishermen whose families have been fishing Fraser-bound sockeye since the 1800s, or, in the case of the Lummis and others from the tribal fleet, since time began.

B.C.’s salmon wars make wonderful politics. The fleet gets preposterous and unjustifiable volumes of fish. The newspapers get thrilling high-seas yams about plucky Canucks outwitting Yankee fish pirates. The politician who counsels these antics the loudest gets the most votes.

Salmon Fleet

Salmon Fleet Source: www.alarmy.com

This might be benign enough, except that the industry’s strategy has been to fish U.S.-bound coho and chinook into extinction, if necessary, in order to frighten Americans away from our sockeye, which the industry likes best.

To be fair, one might say the policy has worked. The only problem is that in order to push American chinook and coho to the brink of extinction, we have to wreak havoc on Canadian chinook and coho, because the fish all mingle together in “mixed-stock” areas. It’s another big reason why our coho are in such trouble.

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The Story of Protecting Salmon (Part I)

Government efforts to protect coho, a variety of fish native to British Colombian coastal areas, have been futile, despite reports of their rapidly declining population. Imposing limits on the size of fishing nets used to harvest coho did not discourage companies from making bountiful catch.

It has been said that a coho salmon will swim up a wet rope, if it has to, to find that little patch of gravel where it was born. Among all the coast’s salmon species, coho are remarkable for their unique beauty, for their distinct survival strategies and for the irritation they will tolerate. There was a time when they were everywhere.

Coho Salmon

Coho Salmon

It has been almost 20 years since fisheries biologists, local anglers, upriver native communities and conservationists began warning that coho were disappearing from their haunts. All along, DFO officials, bullied and browbeaten at the best of times, said it was all right to keep fishing, that the numbers told a different story.

In 1981, a handful of DFO biologists began to confirm what a lot of concerned anglers had suspected, particularly about southern coho. Still, nothing was done to restrain the catch. In fact, it kept rising, from 2.2 million southern coho in 1981 to 3.2 million in 1986.

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Fishing in Southern Oregon

Oregon’s coastal rivers are among the most dramatic and naturally well stocked rivers on earth. Our annual winter rains renew and revitalize the waterways that wild salmon, steelhead, and other fish swim to spawn and complete the cycle of life. Each year, thousands upon thousands of fish return to their home to provide the next generation after spending various amounts of time fattening up in the ocean.

Rouge River Source: wilddriversfishing.com

Rouge River
Source: wilddriversfishing.com

Southern Oregon rivers in particular are famous for their unmatched scenery, solitude and strong salmon and steelhead runs. Generally speaking, you will find good fishing spring, fall and winter on these rivers. The most famous of the rivers is the Rogue, one of the world’s original government protected and preserved waterways. Located near Grants Pass and flowing dozens of miles through pure wilderness towards the ocean, the Rogue has got it all for river fishing. Among other things, the Rogue is one of two or three rivers in the U.S. with wilderness lodges that are quietly located in the forest above the river. These six rustic and charming lodges are in place in the wilderness area due to the fact that they existed before the river was included in the original Wild and Scenic Act, which prohibited future building and all motorized use. Additionally, the Rogue is so well protected the river use is kept to a minimum, meaning you will have a trip with lots of solitude. And, the whitewater on the Rogue is exciting and perfectly placed, with the exhiliration of a rapid being followed by deep calm pools teeming with fish. Continue reading

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Steelhead Fishing in Oregon

The diversity and high numbers of steelhead in Oregon make it fishing paradise. There are huge ones in the coastal rivers. In central and eastern Oregon they are well described as feisty. On the western slope Cascade rivers they can be tricksters. And in southern Oregon, on the Rogue river and others, they come in all shapes and sizes, including the treasured “half pounders”. And, there are both wild and hatchery steelhead that populate Oregon rivers from north to south and east to west.

What is the Steelhead?

Steelhead are unique fish. They are essentially trout that are born and “raised” for a year or two in a river and then travel to the sea for varying periods to “fatten up”. The bigger steelhead are those that typically spend more time in the ocean (generally one to three years on their first cycle into the sea) and the smaller ones, like the “half-pounders” spend less than a year. Steelhead return to their river of birth to spawn. Unlike salmon, they do not die after spawning. Many steelhead head back out to sea a second time and then return again to the river.

steelhead1

It is on the river journeys that steelhead are prime for fishing. What makes Oregon fly fishing so unique is that steelhead return to the various rivers essentially throughout the year. Depending on where you are in the state, you can catch them virtually 365 days a year! Continue reading

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Simple Guidelines for Hunting Deer

Whether you are a beginner or expert seeker, creating and keeping the abilities necessary to be successful when hunting whitetail deer is important. Among the most important of these abilities is expertise of the tool you select to use when you go out on the search. By following some easy, yet efficient guidelines for hunting deer, you will be able to expert your tool of option.

white-tail-deer

As any expert seeker will tell you, you have to be relaxed and dangerous precise when you capture your bow or tool. The only way to make sure that you can create the taken when it matters is to use the most important of deer hunting guidelines and tricks; exercise.

When you consider exercising with your bow or tool, don’t create the error most predators make; exercising a few times or even several weeks before you go out to the forest. To become efficient with your tool, you must exercise with it throughout.

hunting

As aspect of this exercise it is important capture in various circumstances and configurations. This will help to imitate actual lifestyle circumstances you might discover yourself in when on the search. As always, the more genuine the better.

Effective Hunting Deer

However there are some other abilities you can implement when using either the bow or tool. These are very important abilities when it comes to improving your achievements amount. Let’s crack them down:

When preparing to search with your bow, having various capturing choices is important due to the need to have the experience nearer to you so you can get an moral taken. To help offer yourself with extra capturing perspectives and choices, as a bow seeker, you need to come down out of the plants and consider hunting from a floor sightless. Continue reading

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